Top Features of Microsoft Access 2007 That Aren’t Available in Prior Versions

There are many experienced Microsoft Access developers who continue to resist the migration to Access 2007. While there are some changes that are cumbersome, there are many new features that justify the migration. With Access 2007, you can create applications with features that in many cases would be impossible to provide in prior versions. Here are my Top Features of Microsoft Access 2007 That Aren't Available in Prior Versions.

6 thoughts on “Top Features of Microsoft Access 2007 That Aren’t Available in Prior Versions

  1. Hi Bill,

    We are working with the Microsoft Access team to resolve the problem you encountered with Total Access Memo 2007 in Access 2007. Believe me, we’re not happy about it either since the bug is in Access and not our product.

    I also recognize there are issues with going to Access 2007 if people have existing applications with lots of command bars or sendkey commands for menu selections.

    That said, Access 2007 offers a lot of features that were not available in earlier versions and is much more approachable for new users. That’s good for the community.

    Luke

  2. Adding my two cents. I’ve alos been developing in MS Access for a number of years and fine 2007 to be a poor move. Too much hassle for too few benefits.

    Also, I’ve been a FMS Total Access Memo user for many years as pat of my development model. It worked great until 2007 and now I fine that some printing is impossible in 2007 that works fine in 97, 2000, XP and 2003.

    Essentially, FMS Total Access Memo 2007 isn’t even compatible with MS Access 2007.

  3. Hi Shannon,

    Sorry if I came across patronizing. That’s definitely not the intention.

    All I was trying to address was the feedback I’ve received from veteran Access developers who I found hesitant to adopt Access 2007 without fully evaluating the significant enhancements it offers.

    I’m okay with people evaluating Access 2007 and deciding its features don’t warrant the upgrade. However, those people should be careful because there are compelling features and it would be a shame for an Access 2003 expert to be passed by if someone else who knows Access 2007 shows them up in the future.

    Luke

  4. Hi Tom,

    Always appreciate challenges to my conclusions.

    From my experience, I would say Access 95 was by far the worst Access release.

    As for Access 2007, all I can say is that after using the product and getting used to the new ribbons, I find it to be better than prior versions. People I know who’ve gotten comfortable with 2007 find it very difficult to go back to earlier versions. The Search Bar feature alone is a huge productivity boost.

    I would agree that Microsoft could have done things to make it easier to learn. The ribbons definitely took a long time to learn and I still find certain situations where the prior command bars were better than the new ribbons. I agree with you that not supporting command bars is a big compatibility problem.

    However, for me, the most important criteria is whether it allows us to create an Access database application with more functionality for users. On that count, Access 2007 definitely creates solutions with features that weren’t possible in Access 2003 or ealier. It’ll be your call whether those features are worth upgrading. Hopefully you’ll be properly positioned so that if your clients want 2007, you’ll be ready to do so.

    A nice thing about Access 2007 is that the runtime version is free, so cost should not be an issue if you want to distribute Access 2007 applications.

    Luke

  5. I agree.

    Why is Luke Chung writing complete piffle about ‘Philosophical…’ and patronising resisters to this idiotic version as if they were technophobes.

    This man is making me think that FMS has completely lost the plot.

    Kind regards

    Shannon O’Hara

  6. Luke,
    Thank you for your time to produce this article. I was really hoping to find something to change my view about the update – but unfortunately I did not.

    As an Access developer and Access trainer I find the new version of Access to be the worst release that Microsoft has ever made – and yes I lived through change: DBII to Paradox for DOS, Paradox for Windows and all the prior versions of Access.

    I just don’t buy the spin that this new design was done to make end user life easier. I don’t see it, my clients don’t see it. One simple case to point, if Microsoft were so conscience about end user usability, why not include a "Classic" or new "Ribbon" menu switch. Why not include the previous DBW as an option, why remove the publish to Excel feature – my clients use this all the time. The list goes on…

    If this was a new product on the shelf my clients would not buy it and neither would I. Because it is bundled with the Office suite some of my clients do not have much of a choice.