Mar 20

Microsoft Access Query Sorting on Multiple Date or Numeric Fields with Blank Values

Read our new paper: Microsoft Access Sorting on Multiple Date (or Numeric) Fields with Blank Values

Learn how to sort on multiple date fields when null values exist by using a calculated field. By using the IIf function with Is Null, you can easily sort to see the most recent (or oldest) records.

We’ve included information on avoiding the IsNull function to maintain SQL Server compatibility. Additional information and examples are provided to show why using the NZ function (NullToZero) is not equivalent and returns the wrong results.

Microsoft Access QueriesThis new paper is part of our Microsoft Access Query Help Center.

May 24

Microsoft Access Crosstab Queries in Reports on the Microsoft Access Developer Blog

FMS developer Molly Pell is featured as a guest blogger on the Microsoft Access developer blog.

This post demonstrates how to use the Pivot statement to control column names returned by crosstab queries, allowing crosstabs to be used on reports.

Microsoft Access Crosstab Query

Check out the post here: Using crosstab queries in reports

For another paper with an example of Creating an Annual 12 Month Summary Report without VBA Code by Creatively Using a Microsoft Access Crosstab Query

Nov 09

Microsoft Access Append Query Examples and SQL Syntax

We've enhanced our Microsoft Access Query Help Center with a new paper describing Microsoft Access Append (Insert) Queries, and how to use them to add multiple records or a single record to a table.


We also discuss why rather than using a Make Table query, it's preferable to use an existing table, empty it, then fill it with an Append query.

Jun 07

Microsoft Access and SQL Server Union vs. Union All Query Syntax

Microsoft AccessMicrosoft Access Union QueryMicrosoft SQL ServerThe purpose of the SQL UNION query is to combine the results of two or more queries into a single result set. The list contains all the rows belonging to all the queries in the union. This applies to queries in SQL Server or Microsoft Access. A common question is whether to use the UNION or UNION ALL syntax.

The main difference between UNION ALL and UNION is that, UNION only selects distinct values and sorts the results, while UNION ALL selects all values (including duplicates) without sorting. Read our revised paper on UNION versus UNION ALL SQL Syntax to learn more about the differences, see some examples, and understand why you would use one versus the other.

For more tips and using queries, visit our Microsoft Access Query Help Center.

May 31

New Microsoft Access Query Help Center

Microsoft AccessMicrosoft Access QueriesMicrosoft Access Queries are among the most powerful features of MS Access. We have created a new resource center to make it easy to review all our papers related to Microsoft Access Queries. These original works offer tips and techniques aren't found anywhere else. They will help you maximize your use of Microsoft Access queries to better analyze and understand your data. 

In the Microsoft Access Query Help Center you will find papers covering:

Retrieving Records

Modifying Data

Let us know what additional related topics you'd like us to add in the future.