Sep 29

Total Access Statistics for Microsoft Access 2010 is Shipping

Microsoft Access 2010Total Access Statistics 2010

We are very pleased to announce Total Access Statistics for Microsoft Access 2010 is now shipping, along with updates for earlier versions of Access. Total Access Statistics is the most popular data analysis program for Microsoft Access. It extends the data analysis capabilities of Access queries to let you perform advanced numerical analysis on your data. Use any Access table, linked table, or query to perform calculations such as percentiles, regressions, frequency distributions, t-Tests, correlations, non-parametrics, rankings, moving averages, etc. It can also perform data normalization and let you select random records. As you would expect in a query, you can specify Group By fields so analysis is performed on each set of records with identical group fields.

Total Access Statistics runs within Access with all output in Access tables. It supports MDB, ACCDB, and ADP databases.

In addition to supporting Access 2010, we've added Financial Calculations for Cash Flows. It now calculates net present value (NPV), present value (PV), future value (FV), internal rate of return (IRR), and modified internal rates of return (MIRR). There's support for both the 32 and 64 bit versions of Access 2010. It includes both the interactive wizard that runs as an add-in, plus the programmatic VBA library so you can embed statistical analysis in your applications.

Here is additional information for:

Free demo versions are also available for you to download. 

Aug 19

Speed Up Microsoft Access and Visual SourceSafe Integration

Microsoft Visual SourceSafeMicrosoft AccessUsing Microsoft Visual SourceSafe (VSS) with Microsoft Access for system development is great for tracking old versions, maintaining a professional Access development platform, and multi-developer environments. Being able to quickly see old versions of individual objects, differences over time, and check-in and check-out objects to prevent multiple developers from changing the same object are all wonderful features. Visual Source Safe is part of MSDN. By installing the Office/Access developer extensions/edition or Visual Studio Tools for Office (VSTO), VSS gets added to your Access menus.

Unfortunately, as Access databases get more objects, VSS slows down and can sometimes take minutes to add a new object to the database. Waiting for VSS to prompt you for every new object not only wastes time (especially if you don't want to add a temporary object to VSS), it disrupts the rhythm of system development. Fortunately, there's an easy way to work around this. Read this paper Speed Up Microsoft Access and Visual SourceSafe Integration for details, including Access 2010.

Jun 24

Microsoft Access Tip: Problems Converting a Database in Access 2007 from ACCDB to MDB

From Access 2007, you may want to convert an Access ACCDB database to a legacy MDB format. You may have done it several times before but all of a sudden, you get this message:

 

It turns out this occurs if the database was opened with Microsoft Access 2010.

Learn more about the issue and workaround here: You cannot save this database in an earlier version format, because it uses features that require the current file format

May 26

Invitation to Preview Version of Total Access Statistics for Microsoft Access 2010

Microsoft Access 2010Total Access Statistics 2010

We are pleased to announce the availability of the preview version of Total Access Statistics for Microsoft Access 2010. Total Access Statistics is the most popular data analysis program for Microsoft Access. It extends the data analysis capabilities of Access queries to let you perform advanced numerical analysis on your data. Use any Access table, linked table, or query to perform calculations such as percentiles, regressions, frequency distributions, t-Tests, correlations, non-parametrics, rankings, moving averages, etc. It can also perform data normalization and let you select random records. As you would expect in a query, you can specify Group By fields so analysis is performed on each set of records with identical group fields.

Total Access Statistics runs within Access with all output in Access tables. It supports MDB, ACCDB, and ADP databases.

In addition to supporting Access 2010, we've added financial calculations for cash flows. It now calculates net present value (NPV), present value (PV), future value (FV), internal rate of return (IRR), and modified internal rates of return (MIRR).

This FREE preview is available with support for both the 32 and 64 bit versions of Access 2010. It includes both the interactive wizard that runs as an add-in, plus the programmatic VBA library so you can embed statistical analysis in your applications.

The preview version is fully functional through September 1. Download it here: http://fmsinc.com/MicrosoftAccess/dataanalysis/preview2010.asp

May 11

Microsoft Access 2010’s New Feature to Web Enable Access Databases

Microsoft Access 2010

One of the most compelling features of Microsoft Access 2010 is its ability to post an Access database on a SharePoint 2010 site and have it run over the web. Some people hear this and think they'll be able to take their existing Access application, all its VBA code, etc., and make it web enabled. Unfortunately, that's not the case. What you can expose to the web is forms and reports that don't use VBA code. That's obviously a severe limitation, but on the plus side, what is possible is the deployment of databases that have automation through Access macros. The macros are automatically converted to JavaScript code. That's pretty cool.

An Access database that's hosted in this way can still be used locally on a desktop that has Access 2010 installed with all the rich functionality of Access, VBA, etc. The data is then hosted in SharePoint which exposes it to the web. So while it's not making it possible to publish an entire Access application with VBA to the web, at least a portion of it may be exposed with little to no additional effort. Letting people browse data, filter, and generate simple reports is all available and possible by non-programmers. It's a big step forward for the Access community.