May 24

Microsoft Access Crosstab Queries in Reports on the Microsoft Access Developer Blog

FMS developer Molly Pell is featured as a guest blogger on the Microsoft Access developer blog.

This post demonstrates how to use the Pivot statement to control column names returned by crosstab queries, allowing crosstabs to be used on reports.

Microsoft Access Crosstab Query

Check out the post here: Using crosstab queries in reports

For another paper with an example of Creating an Annual 12 Month Summary Report without VBA Code by Creatively Using a Microsoft Access Crosstab Query

May 09

Microsoft Access Database Architecture: Taking Time into Account and Shadow Tables


When designing an application and its tables, it’s very important to capture the time dimension and determine how data should be stored with the expectation that it will change over time. While there’s a natural tendency to keep data normalized so that the same information is stored in only one place, the time dimension also needs to be considered.

  • What Needs to be Preserved Over Time?
  • Making Sure Data Normalization Doesn’t Lose Historical Data
  • Shadow Tables

For more details, read our paper: Microsoft Access Database Architecture: Taking Time into Account and Shadow Tables

Additional papers and resources in our Microsoft Access Developer and VBA Programming Help Center

May 01

Microsoft Access Database Architecture: Storing Temporary Data and User Settings

Read our new paper on:

Microsoft Access Database Architecture: Storing Temporary Data and User Settings

There are many things a user does with an application that need to be preserved either during processing, between screens, between sessions, or between application updates/versions. When designing a system, it’s important to consider what needs to be kept and where/how to do this. If designed properly, the data should also support multi-user environments.

Problem

Users are commonly annoyed to be forced to re-enter their last specifications when the application should start with that as its default. After all, a computer is supposed to be good at remembering things, right?

Solutions

There are several ways to preserve user information during a session, on a PC, and/or between PCs:

  • Keeping Selections in Memory for the Current Session
  • Using the Registry to Store User Information Between Sessions
  • Using Private Tables to Store Information Between Sessions
  • Making Sure Previous Values Remain Valid

Read the paper for more details and tips.